Leah Durner

 
 

Leah Durner's work occupies the critical space between modernism and postmodernism—between postwar abstraction and post-Duchampian conceptualism and post-Warholian pop.  Durner's practice includes paintings in oil, acrylic, and gouache on canvas and on paper, as well as works in poured enamel.  Her work in poured enamel references psychedelia and process art with deeper roots in the exuberance of the Baroque and Rococo as well as in the modernist tradition of abstraction. 

Durner has also curated exhibitions, published art theory, and lectured on a number of topics, including the American landscape; gestural abstraction and phenomenology; conceptualism and its sources; Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own and art, money, and gender; the work of the artist Dan Graham; and the work of composers Maryanne Amacher and John Cage. Durner’s current theoretical interests include beauty, joy, largesse, and incarnated consciousness.  

Durner lives and works in New York City.