Sandra Filippucci

 
 

Contemporary figurative artist Sandra Filippucci works in an almost obsessive manner with a particular subject in the mediums of encaustic, oils, mixed media, drawings, found objects, plaster boxes, and bronzes. Her work is about process—rough and aggressive surfaces that construct a narrative about peace, vulnerability and determination. For a number of years, Filippucci has concentrated her efforts on a series of paintings and sculptures using 3D technology to express her unique interpretation of the life of Joan of Arc—who is as relevant now as she was in the past. Mark Twain eulogized Joan in print as “by far the most extraordinary person the human race has ever produced.” 

Filippucci has lectured and had exhibitions and solos at the Museum of American Illustration, Colgate University, Syracuse University, The Morrison Gallery, The Maryland Institute, and in Santa Fe: Linda Durham, Turner Carroll and the Owings Dewey Gallery, and recently contributed work for the Santa Fe Artists Medical Fund at Santa Fe’s Blue Rain Gallery. Her work is in many private, public, and corporate collections. 

Portrait of Sandra Filippucci by Audrey Durell 2015, Santa Fe


Portrait of Sandra Filippucci by Audrey Durell 2015, Santa Fe

The Many Faces of Joan
"I am often asked why Joan. I don’t really know. Perhaps because she is an inexhaustible subject with many faces, many identities. Perhaps it is because she was fearless. Not mad, insane, dotty, or touched, but fearless. Perhaps because her brilliant answers to crafty lawyers still takes my breath away. Joan’s “voices” revealed to her what her mission would be at age seventeen (save France from the English who were devouring her country so instead of Brie we might have just had Cheddar). Joan’s astonishing common sense and guts drew her rapidly into history. Within a few years, she evolved from a pious, unlettered country girl to a visionary soldier. She was called a whore when she offered peace (Joan always offered peace first), a witch when she predicted outcomes, was burned when she became too “dangerous,” and was designated a saint when her unjust death was revealed as a illegal attempt by corrupt church officials to silence her.”